A reconstruction of Homo naledi’s head by paleoartist John Gurche, who spent some 700 hours recreating the head from bone scans. The find was announced by the University of the Witwatersrand, the National Geographic Society and the South African National Research Foundation and published in the journal eLife. 
Photo by Mark Thiessen/National Geographic

From the Cradle to the grave? #NalediFossils

First published on wildonscience.com | #NalediFossils   They moved the bodies in one at a time, from the old with their worn teeth to newborn babies. If they had been modern humans, the Dinaledi Chamber would have been called a burial site. But the creatures are not human. Homo naledi (“naledi” means star in the local Sotho…

Photo: The Conversation

Species without boundaries: a new way to map our origins

by Francis Thackeray, University of the Witwatersrand More than 145 years ago, Charles Darwin argued that Africa was the continent from which humans evolved in prehistory. We now know he was right. We have the evidence to prove from prehistoric remains that our distant human relatives go back at least seven million years. Certainly, the fossil…

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Meer fossiele as ooit tevore gekry

Meer menslike fossiele is al in die nuwe Rising Star-grot gekry as wat paleontoloë sedert 1935 in die Wieg van die Mensdom versamel het. Prof. Lee Berger van die Universiteit van die Witwatersrand (Wits) se Instituut vir Evolusionêre Studies het aan Die Burger vertel dat 1 500 individuele fossiele al in dié grot digby Sterkfontein gevind…

Mens braai al van toeka af lekker

Wanneer Suid-Afrikaners ’n tjoppie op die kole sit, doen hulle iets wat die moderne mens se voorsate al derduisende jare gelede die eerste keer gedoen het. Waar presies kom braai vandaan? Dit is hier in Suid-Afrika, by Swartkrans in Gauteng en naby die fossielryke Sterkfontein, waar prof. Bob Brain, paleontoloog, die oudste bewyse van die…