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Oh rats! What can we learn about our health from cooldrink studies?

 A group of Stellenbosch University physiologists and a researcher from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology tested what happens when rats drank a sugar-sweetened beverage for three months. This was done in an effort to understand more clearly what happens in the body when you drink too much sweetened cooldrink. Researchers are increasingly realising that…

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[LISTEN] The Science Inside – Sugar Tax

We all love the sweet side of life, but with the government planning to tax sugary drinks, we’re having a look at all things sugar. Aviva Tugendhaft from Priceless tells us why the sugar tax will lower obesity. Hamish van Wyk, from the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology, talks to us about a type of…

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Plate reflects purse in South Africa

Thandi Puoane, University of the Western Cape The stream of media coverage about diets may suggest that the majority of South Africans are pre-occupied with the latest food fads. But what people choose to eat is more often dictated by class and their purses than clinical decisions about what is good for them. Malnutrition, diabetes,…

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#SciBraaiSides 24 October 2014

After a short break, Scibraai Sides are back, with thoughts about mountain biking and mediation on the one side, and diabetes and the use of Vitamin A supplements in children. Put some science behind your MTB tyre talk When next you and your mountain bike buddies have a discussion about which to use – 26in.…

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We ate McDonald’s in the name of science

In this episode we investigate diet fads like #Paleo and #Noakes. We find out if high-fat, low-carb eating is good for your cholesterol, and we look at the recent news that sugary drinks may soon be taxed just like alcohol and cigarettes. [View the story “We ate MacDonald’s in the name of science” on Storify]…

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Baby, make those genes talk

You will respond to medication differently to the person sitting next to you. A friend of a different race may be more susceptible to diabetes than you are; you could be at greater risk of developing hypertension. These signposts, which point to your disease risks and whether a certain medication will work for you, can…